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Two Way Cycling Expansion in Kensington and Chelsea


06/09/2012



One of the most frustrating things for cyclists like us who like to potter down the side streets is that all too often the streets are one way.  And generally not in the right way! This means riding a bit further than we might want to.  So we’re working hard to open these one way streets to cyclists.

 

In 2010 we were the first borough in London to launch a trial to open up our one way streets for two way cycling using ‘except cyclists’ signs under our ‘no entry’ signs.  The initial trial on five streets around Kensington and Chelsea was a big success and the DfT approved our approach so any Council can now put up ‘except cyclist’ signs under their ‘no entry’ signs.  So earlier this year we agreed to open a further 11 one way streets for two way cycling. 

 

 

Now we want to open up more of our one way streets*… whilst we know which streets help us to get around easily, we want to make sure we’re also looking at the streets most useful to you.  So please tell us which one way streets in Kensington and Chelsea you would like to be able to cycle on in both directions.

 

Leave your comments in the box below or send us a tweet/facebook message or email us at cycling@rbkc.gov.uk.

 

*this approach is only possible on quieter one way streets with low traffic flows and speeds.  In busier streets we’d need to look at contra-flow cycle lanes.  We’re happy to hear all your suggestions though so please fire away.

26 comments

  1. Ben Godfrey says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Awesome! London’s back streets are a great resource for cyclists. Some of them are rat runs, which I guess is why the one way systems have been set up. A few tweaks would turn them into great corridors for cycling – much safer and more pleasant than the large roads that have been used for the cycle superhighways.

    Is there any detail on which streets this will be?

  2. RBKC says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Hi Ben,

    We’re currently looking at locations for two way cycling so would love any suggestions you might have.

    Best regards

    Bikeminded

  3. Tom Griffiths says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    I think its a great idea and I’ve used a huge amount of these streets, usually to cut around High Street Ken. However a lot of them are littered with speed bumps. When you’re on a road bike are an absolute paid and can damage your bike. Not only do they make your journey more uncomfortable, they also mean you can cycle at proper speeds. Would there be a way of taking out small sections either side of the road for bikes to use?

  4. s kenzie says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Hillgate Street! Getting access to Fox School from Notting Hill Gate would be made much easier when cycling with a child, which i have been doing for several years now!

    • Tak says:

      Nov 23, 2012

      Reply

      Yes, these drivers are eiethr irresponsible or simply daft or/and unaware of any traffic member but a car.I would suggest to write down the number plates of these unsocially behaving drivers and publish them here.Have fun!

  5. Paul James says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    The maze of one-way streets that are Lansdowne and Clarendon Rd would be excellent candidates.

    Also you see loads of pavement cyclists on Royal Crescent because of the one-way, but you’d need a contra-flow. Pleeeeeeeaase, 4 car lanes (2 moving, 2 parking) is too many.

  6. Matthew Butt says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    An east-west contraflow on Holland Street between Hornton Street and Campden Hill Road—behind Kensington Town Hall—would make huge sense, providing a near-direct backstreet route from Kensington Gardens to Holland Park.

    Then all that would be needed is to permit careful cycling in Holland Park and behind York House, and you would have a lovely Kensington High Street bypass.

    • Susan says:

      Sep 6, 2012

      Reply

      Having that streatch of Holland Road as a cycling as a contraflow for people travelling east to west would make sense (it’s why I don’t use that route on my return home in the evenings).

      Opening up Holland Park from Ilchester Place to the North-South cycling lane would be great too, but I can appreciate many parents with small children might be concerned for their safety.

      With Holland Park crossing available for cyclists I would use this route regularly, as opposed to once in a while on a sunny day when I am not in too much of a hurry and can enjoy the walk pushing my bike.

      At the moment I either head down to High St Ken and along, or up Notting Hill and then through the Park past the Round Pond.

  7. David Sibley says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    A small part of Pembroke villas on the South East side of Edward’s Square, to allow cycles to go from Kensignton High St to the Police station on Earls Court Road via Earl’s walk. This would cut down the extent of the need to cycle along Kensignton High St for those coming from Shepherd’s bush along the quieter roads such as Elsham/Russel Road and continuing south of Kensignton High St towards South Kensignton / Knightsbridge

  8. Dave Cosgrave says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Anywhere around Paddington please which is a nightmare to get to on a bike from the south at the moment.Can bikes also be allowed to turn right when only buses are too please?

  9. Alex Ball says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Can we open up the one way streets around South Kensington Station, especially Thurloe Square and Thurloe Street, the southern part of the Exhibtion Road scheme after it crosses Thurloe Place.
    Sumner Place and Onslow Square would also be nice to allow cyclists to connect up with Fulham Road and cross into Old Brompton Road.
    The final piece of the puzzle would be Glendower Place, Reece Mews and Queensberry Place which would give full permeabilitfy from Fulham Road all the way up to Cromwell Road.

  10. Susan says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    Also can we have Victoria Grove added to this list. It’s quite long and blocks cyclists going east towards the Museaums and Imperial College campus.

  11. Ruth Pâtés says:

    Sep 6, 2012

    Reply

    This sounds fantastic. We are trying to I would persuade our council to do the same. Is RB K&C evaluation of the first phase published anywhere? Couldn’t find it on the website.

  12. Clare Byrne says:

    Sep 7, 2012

    Reply

    The really obvious one in K and C is the piece of road between Holland street (which is one way but already has a bike path counterflow) and Duchess of Bedford’s walk (which is two way). There is a stretch running beside the Town Hall that is one way, which is the only little bit you can’t cycle on a clear ride between Holland Park and Kensington Gardens avoiding the high street. I have no idea why this hasn’t been made cycle friendly a long time ago. As it is, a lot of people dangerously cycle up the pavement or against the traffic. To ride legally you have to go a fairly long way around, up a road that is two way but is very narrow and tends to only have a lot of fast moving traffic coming towards you when riding north.

    I also agree with the poster above who mentioned the streets around Clarendon Road. Riding from the Harrow Road (coming from Camden/Primrose Hill/Regent’s Park on a daily commute) across Westbourne Grove and down, trying to avoid the main roads, TFL’s cycling journey planner takes you along Talbot Road, across Portobello and Ladbroke Grove and then down these streets to the edge of Holland Park near the Shepherd’s Bush roundabout. A lot of this route is nice, small roads, but many could use improvement for cyclists.

  13. Sally Collins says:

    Sep 7, 2012

    Reply

    The no right turn for cyclists coming from Brompton road onto Exhibition rd is really frustrating, and with Exhibition Rd now being such a cyclist-friendly road, especially with the extra bank of Barclays bikes, this seems unecessary. Also less restriction round the one way system at South Kensington tube station for cyclists would be very welcome. There is a huge community of cyclists in South Ken- the three museums’ staff and Imperial College students are cycling communities I’m particualrly aware of. I work at NHM and there are lots of cyclists here would would benefit form more cyclist-friendly roads/routes in the area.

  14. Lucas says:

    Sep 7, 2012

    Reply

    there is this bit of Thurloe Sq which is only one way:

    http://goo.gl/maps/LtSAM

    and Anderson street:

    http://goo.gl/maps/lh32m

    which will be quite helpful if they become both ways to cycle south, as they are quite roads.

    Cheers

  15. Bikeminded says:

    Sep 7, 2012

    Reply

    We’re currently looking at locations for two-way cycling, so would love any suggestions you might have.

    Thanks to everyone for their comments so far. Keep them coming!

    Best regards

    Bikeminded

  16. Jude says:

    Sep 10, 2012

    Reply

    Brook Street – means that cyclists coming out of Hyde Park (West Carriage Drive) can head up to Edgware Road along the cycle route without having to divert left and wiggle through the lengthy and dangerous gyratory system at Lancaster Gate

  17. Peter Slootweg says:

    Sep 10, 2012

    Reply

    Victoria Grove and Kensington Square, Lowndes Place and Lyall Street, as well as Elizabeth Street near the Coach station and Eccleston Square

  18. SaraF says:

    Sep 10, 2012

    Reply

    Two way one way streets has clearly been phenomenal success. Most of the really busy one ways are TFL’s responsibility and cannot be changed by RBKC so might it be easier to ask if there are any RBKC one ways which need to remain one way to cyclists? I can’t think of any (that’s not surprising as they were conceived in order to control motor vehicles)

  19. David Ham says:

    Sep 11, 2012

    Reply

    I would like to second Thurloe square, and in particular the Southern half of the Western side of the Square. Permitting 2-way cycling here would allow cyclists travelling South-East from Exhibition Road to bypass the busy intersection outside Sth Ken station by travelling Exhibition-Road => Thurloe Street => Thurloe Square.

  20. NP says:

    Sep 15, 2012

    Reply

    1) Olympia Way, between Kensington Olympia station and Hammersmith Road. The street is one way, and avoiding it requires a rather long detour when cycling from West to East.

    2) I also suggest opening one east to west alley in Holland Park for cyclists from the Park’s gate on Ilchester rd to its exit at Philmore Gardens. That is de facto a street going through the park – which disrupts entirely any attempt to go east-west through that part of Kensington avoiding the very busy High Street Kensington.

  21. fred says:

    Sep 25, 2012

    Reply

    I think the City of London’s policy now is to enable two-way cycling in all the streets where it’s safe to do so. Perhaps RBKC can do the same

  22. Bob Jones says:

    Jan 13, 2013

    Reply

    It’s such a pity that Brighton remains in the Dark Ages in terms of cycling provision, as this story demonstrates: http://road.cc/content/news/73530-%C2%A31000-bill-brighton-cyclist-who-rode-wrong-way-one-way-street

  23. Karen says:

    Aug 8, 2013

    Reply

    Portobello Road – even if it had to say excluding Saturday. The rest of the week including Friday is very quiet in rush hour times and the section from the top to Golbourne Road is always empty of traffic

  24. NS says:

    Aug 12, 2013

    Reply

    Upper Cheyne Row

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